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20130801
20130831
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, in washington, d.c., in st. louis, in kansas city, in detroit, in flint, michigan, and other areas around this -- fast food workers. they were people who work in burger king, mcdonald's, popeye, they are the ones who give you the hamburgers and the french fries. what they are saying is workers all over this country, they cannot make it on $7.25 an hour, $7.50 an hour. often they are unable to get 40 hours of work and in most cases they get no or very limited benefits. all over the country, these workers, often young people, are walking out of their establishments, their fast-food places and are educating the consumers about the economic injustice taking place in these fast-food establishments. what they are saying is we need to raise the minimum wage in this country, that american workers cannot exist on $7.25 an hour which is the national minimum wage now or $8 an hour or $9 an hour. my own view is that the very least we should be raising the minimum wage to $10 an hour. just do the arithmetic. if somebody is making $7.25 an hour and if they are lucky enough to be getting 40 hours a week
government must step in to ensure the state and local government. the problem detroit faced is that -- >> state, local, and tribal government. >> and tribal government. [laughter] >> okay. >> the problem with detroit, unlike many municipalities that depend on revenue from real estate tax, they run on income taxes. they never recovered from 2001. the black unemployment rate never recovered from 2001. that downturn decimated the revenue stream for the city, and it never came back. if there are banks that are too big to fail, and we have to step in to make sure they function, there are cities that are too big to fail. [applause] >> bankruptcy in one of those cities. >> yes, and so it is not enough for the administration to say, oh, we're behind you, droit. no. we said to wall street, $800 billion we're behind you, so that's being behind me. [laughter] >> okay. behind you, what are the policies? >> so, wall street caused more damage than what we have put into the budget. there needs to be a financial transaction tax because when they gamble, we lose. [applause] they have to pay
court case of a couple of years ago and, obviously, municipal concerns like the city of detroit. define for us what exactly is eminent domain? >> guest: well, thank you, bill. and, again, it's a pleasure to be back on "washington journal." eminent domain is the power of government to take private property. it's actually a very old power. kings in europe exercised it hundreds of years ago. garage -- gradually the custom arose that people have to be compensated when their property was taken. and it was certainly an attribute of the british crown. so after the revolution the states had the power, and interestingly the fifth amendment to the federal constitution says that nor shall private property be taken without just compensation. it doesn't actually give the federal government the power, it simply assumes that as a sovereign the federal government has that power. >> and was that fifth amendment built into the constitution based on the experiences of the colonies with the crown? >> well, this is a very fascinating point because the crown had abused the colonies in, many ways. so you have
and the loss of more than half of detroit's population as a result. 8:00 eastern, booktv in prime time. tonight the focus on book fairs and festivals of the past year, including a discussion from the harlem book fair, and a look at the book, "stalin secrets," author ann romney and a book about whitty bulger. we'll -- >> i'm not some sort of anti-suburb person who thinks everyone needs to live in new york city and, you know i was very sensitive to be coming across as a sort of a espresso-sipping, condo-dwelling elitist of sometime. that is not why i did this book. i understand why people like the suburbs. i get fed up with a lot of daily life in new york city a lot. i was more drawn, the trend were so undeniable. the fact there is a shift the way suburban america perceived by people that live there is too big of a story to ignore. >> the earliest extent letter we have, dates to october 1762 and we call it the miss adorable letter because that is how john adams opens the letter. so it is john writing to abigail and he says, miss adorable, by the same token that the bearer here of sat up with laws
for the administration to say, oh, we're behind you, detroit. no. we said to wall street $800 billion we're behind you, so that's being behind me. [laughter] >> okay. mark -- [inaudible] that's behind you. what would be some of those policies? >> so wall street caused more damage than what we have put into the budget. there needs to be a financial transaction tax, because when they -- [applause] we lose. and they have to pay for cleaning up the whole mess. not just their mess, not just the mess that let them get their jobs back, get their bonuses back and then argue for a tax cut after they got their bonuses and we saved their bankrupt companies. if we saved aig that was bankrupt, we can save detroit that's bankrupt. and if aig who caused the downturn in the first place could get a bonus because it stated in their contract they had to get a bonus, then detroit city workers can get a pension just hike it said in their contract. [applause] .. which of course makes the united states different and unique from other countries in the world supporting the immigrants now no other country even comes close. but
, but treating affects down here. and the most dramatic example of that, of course, is stuxnet which detroit about 1000 centrifuges. stuxnet almost what i conducted by a nationstate because it's too complicated to be done in a garage or in your basement, all right? look, given my background, former director of cia, i think it's absolute unavoidable good. but i'll describe what i just described to you in just like they did forward. somewhat almost certain initiative during a time of these just use a cyber weapon to destroy another nation's critical infrastructure. ouch. that's a big deal. you may or may not see me making a comment on 60 mins about a year and a half ago in which i can characterize that as somebody crossing a river gone, got a leaking on the other side of the river, and life will be very different. so those are your sins. stealing your stuff, disrupting the network, destroying their infrastructure. who are the sinners? nationstates. you know that. criminal elements, and then finally this third group that it would have trouble defining, nihilists, anarchists, activists, losec, a
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6